Bond 2019 FAQs

  • Has the Aledo ISD tax rate decreased this year?

    Posted by:


    Yes, it has. Aledo ISD has maintained the same tax rate of $1.5950 since the 2015-2016 school year. With the passage of House Bill 3 during the recent legislative session, AISD is projected to receive additional state funding that has permitted a required tax rate compression, or decrease, of 10 cents to $1.4933. Based on the 2019 average appraised home value ($360,394) in Aledo ISD, this tax rate decrease would result in a $341.00 savings.


    Comments (-1)
  • How is it possible for this bond package to result in no tax rate increase?

    Posted by:


    The bond package will result in no tax rate increase due to local property value growth and the District’s management of debt over time.

    • Property value growth
      • The District has experienced significant property value growth in the past three years.
      • With the new residential development that is currently underway, and is projected to continue, the District’s property values are projected to continue increasing for the next several years.
      • This property value growth equates to more property tax revenue to pay bond debt without a tax rate increase.  
      • Based on conservative projections of property value growth and interest rates, the District’s tax rate won’t change as a result of this potential bond election.
         
    • Aggressively managing the District’s current bond debt
      • The District and its Financial Advisor actively manage the District’s outstanding bond debt.
      • The District has provided taxpayers more than $34 million in interest cost savings since 2006 by using financially conservative, yet aggressive, debt management strategies. At every opportunity, the District pays debt early and or refinances debt to save costs. More than 50% of these interest cost savings have occurred since 2014.
      • The debt management strategies utilized by the District are similar to an individual refinancing their home mortgage when interest rates decline.

     

    Comments (-1)
  • What is a bond?

    Posted by:


    A bond is comparable to a home mortgage. A bond is a contract to repay borrowed money with interest over time. Bonds are sold by a school district to competing lenders to raise funds to pay for the costs of construction, renovations and equipment. Bonds are utilized by most schools in the state to finance facilities.

     

    Comments (-1)
  • What is a bond election?

    Posted by:


    School districts are required by state law to ask voters for permission to sell bonds to investors in order to raise the capital dollars required for projects such as renovation to existing buildings or building a new school. Through this, voters are giving permission for the district to take out a loan and pay that loan back over an extended period of time, much like a family takes out a mortgage loan for their home. A school board calls a bond election so voters can decide whether or not they want to pay for proposed facility projects.

    Comments (-1)
  • How can bond funds be used?

    Posted by:


    Bond funds can be used to pay for new buildings, additions and renovations to existing facilities, land acquisitions, technology infrastructure, buses and equipment for new or existing buildings. Bonds cannot be used for salaries or operating costs such as utilities, instructional materials, fuel and insurance.

    Comments (-1)
  • How was the bond package constructed?

    Posted by:


    The community-driven Bearcat Growth Committee (BGC) was charged by the Aledo ISD Board of Trustees to examine the District’s increasing student enrollment growth data, financial information, district-wide facility needs, and instructional goals. The BGC, which was led by community co-chairs Christi James and Jim Scott and included 36 fellow community members. The BGC held 10 meetings from January to August and built a bond recommendation which focuses on student capacity and learning spaces at the middle and elementary school levels. Click here to watch the BGC's bond recommendation and explanation of the projects to the School Board.

    Comments (-1)
  • What is included in the 2019 bond package?

    Posted by:

     

    The Aledo ISD Board of Trustees approved the Bearcat Growth Committee’s (BGC) recommendation of a $149,950,000 bond proposal, which will be presented on the November 5 ballot as a single proposition and will not include a tax rate increase.

    The BGC, which was led by community co-chairs Christi James and Jim Scott and included 36 fellow community members, held 10 meetings from January to August examining the District’s increasing student enrollment growth data, financial information, district-wide facility needs, and instructional goals. The BGC built a bond recommendation which focuses on student capacity needs and learning spaces at the middle and elementary school levels.

    The bond package includes funding for two new campuses, renovations to three existing campuses, replacement furniture at three elementary schools, land for future school sites, and school buses.


    BOND PACKAGE- $149,950,000

    • Middle School No. 2 - $62,501,000
      -Grade-level (6,7,8) academic wings
      -Located on Old Weatherford Road
      -1,200 student capacity
      -Opens Falls 2022

    • Aledo Middle School Renovation/Expansion - $33,446,000
      -Grade-level (6,7,8) academic wings
      -New library, fine arts wing, cafeteria space, field house
      -1,200 student capacity
      -Opens Fall 2022

    • Elementary School No. 6 - $35,858,000
      -Grade-level academic wings
      -Located on FM 5 in Annetta
      -Opens Falls 2021

    • McAnally Intermediate Renovation to Elementary School - $9,611,000
      -Grade-level academic wings
      -Additional classrooms
      -800 student capacity
      -Opens Falls 2022

    • Vandagriff Renovation to Early Childhood Campus - $1,709,000
      -Pre-Kindergarten
      -Preschool Program for Children with Disabilities
      -Daycare for Aledo ISD employees
      -Opens Falls 2022

    • Coder Elementary, Stuard Elementary, McCall Elementary furniture replacement - $1,800,000
      -Supports collaborative learning and Aledo ISD's Instructional Focus

    • Land for future school sites - $4,525,000

    • School buses - $500,000

    Comments (-1)
  • When will the election be held?

    Posted by:


    The election will be held Tuesday, November 5. The Aledo ISD bond package will be a single proposition on the ballot. Election day polling locations include the Aledo ISD administration building, located at 1008 Bailey Ranch Road.

    Comments (-1)
  • When and where can I vote?

    Posted by:


    Early voting for the 2019 bond will be from October 21 to November 1. Early voting locations include the Aledo ISD Administration Building (1008 Bailey Ranch Road), the Willow Park Municipal Building (516 Ranch House Road) and the Parker County Courthouse Annex (1112 Sante Fe Drive). Click here to visit the Parker County website.

    Comments (-1)
  • Will this bond election impact taxpayers 65 years old and older?

    Posted by:


    According to state law, the dollar amount of school taxes imposed on the residence homestead of a person 65 years old or older cannot be increased above the amount paid in the first year after the person turned 65. This amount remains the same regardless of changes in tax rate or property value unless significant improvements are made to the home. Individuals 65 and over must apply for this exemption.

    Comments (-1)
  • When would Coder, Stuard and McCall receive the new furniture, if the bond passes?

    Posted by:


    The new furniture would be received by Coder, Stuard and McCall in the Summer of 2020.  The existing furniture would be removed in early summer and new furniture would be delivered before school opens after summer cleaning and waxing.

    Comments (-1)
  • How long would it take to pay off this bond?

    Posted by:


    Based on market conditions at the time of selling these bonds, the District typically issues 30-year bonds. Much like a home mortgage, a portion of the bond principal is paid off each year. The final bond principal payment would be made 30 years after issuance. 

    Comments (-1)
  • What is the role of Aledo ISD’s new Director of Facilities & Construction?

    Posted by:


    In the fall of 2018, the Aledo ISD Administration and Board of Trustees created the District’s first Director of Facilities & Construction position. The Administration and Board created the position so that Aledo ISD would have a construction professional on staff to serve the facility needs of the rapidly growing student population, and to represent, above all else, the interests of the Aledo ISD students, staff, and community. Tyler Boswell was hired by the Board of Trustees in November of 2018, and he leads and coordinates all facility planning and construction in the District, including the planning and implementation of bond programs. Mr. Boswell has more than 20 years of experience in leading all phases of construction projects, and most recently worked in Arlington ISD as a project manager supervising 15 bond projects.

    Comments (-1)
  • What does bond capacity mean?

    Posted by:


    Bond capacity is defined as the amount of new debt the District can issue in light of the District’s current Interest & Sinking tax rate and within the limitations of state law.

    Comments (-1)
  • What is the life cycle of the new schools in this bond proposal?

    Posted by:

     

    The new schools proposed in this bond will have a life-cycle commensurate with all properly designed and maintained public buildings such as government office buildings, public schools, hospitals, etc., which is intended to be 50+ years.

    Comments (-1)
  • What increases bond capacity?

    Posted by:


    Bond capacity increases as property tax values grow, bonds are repaid, and/or the District reduces its bond interest rate/borrowing costs.

    Comments (-1)
  • What are the District’s bond ratings?

    Posted by:


    S&P Global Ratings assigns a “AA” credit rating to the District, defined as “Having a very strong capacity to meet its financial commitments. It differs from the highest rating only to a small degree.” 
    Fitch Ratings, Inc. assigns a “AA” credit rating to the District, defined as “Very high quality. A “AA” rating denotes expectations of very low default risk and very strong capacity for payment of financial commitments.”

    Comments (-1)
  • What would be the school colors and mascot for Middle School #2?

    Posted by:


    Keeping in tradition with all Aledo ISD campuses, Middle School #2 would use orange and black colors and the Bearcat mascot.

    Comments (-1)
  • When would construction begin, if the bond passes?

    Posted by:


    If the bond passes, Aledo ISD would begin selecting architects and contractors in November to begin project designs. Site work would begin in the Spring of 2020 on the new elementary school (ES #6) and Winter of 2020 for the remainder of the projects.

    Comments (-1)
  • Will school be held while the buildings are being renovated at Aledo Middle, Vandagriff Elementary a

    Posted by:


    Yes, school will be held concurrently with construction, as is very common in K-12 construction projects. The bulk of the construction that may impact students/staff will occur over the course of (2) summer periods. The contractors, along with the architects and AISD (owner), will work together to phase the work around the campus schedule and needs. This involves barriers, fences with screening and temporary partition walls to maintain separation from the contractors and students/staff. The contractors will have a fenced area with screening to house a job trailer, material laydown yard, portable toilets, and worker parking. AISD utilizes a third-party background check badging program for all contract construction workers to be permitted on-site.

    Comments (-1)
  • If there is a future economic downturn, will the district be able to pay off the debt associated wit

    Posted by:


    With the conservative assumptions projected for future property value in the District, coupled with only using four (4) years of property value growth, the District will be able to pay off the debt associated with this bond proposal if there is a future economic downturn.

    Comments (-1)
  • Did the Bearcat Growth Committee consider the District’s needs at the high school level?

    Posted by:


    Yes. The BGC studied student growth projections presented by the District’s outside demographer at every grade level served by the district. The demographer’s projections show that the student population at the Aledo High School/Daniel Ninth Grade Campus complex is expected to exceed the maximum capacity of the facilities around 2026 or 2027. The BGC made the decision that the need for capacity at the middle school and elementary school levels was more immediate, since maximum capacity is expected to be exceeded at Aledo Middle School in one year (2020-2021) and at the elementary level in two years (2021-2022). The BGC identified middle school and elementary school capacity, as well as land for future school sites and school buses, as the priorities for the 2019 Bond proposal that they recommended to the Board of Trustees.

    The decision regarding how to increase the District’s capacity to serve students in grades 9-12 is a significant one. Because it is such a significant decision, in the coming years, and in plenty of time to address the need for more high school-level space for students in 2026 or 2027, the District will facilitate a process through which community members are engaged in making this decision. There are multiple options other than constructing a second comprehensive high school, including expanding the current facilities.  The District expects that increasing high school-level capacity will be achieved through a future bond election.

    Comments (-1)

Demographics

  • What is the difference between functional and maximum capacity? And who sets this?

    Posted by:


    The maximum capacity of a school is having every seat filled in every designated teaching space for every period of the school day. Building and life-safety codes may be impactful on this number. Functional capacity takes into consideration schedule flexibility, average designed student-to-teacher ratio, and desired use of spaces. Capacity values for a school are determined by the physical space available.

    Comments (-1)
  • How and when will attendance zones be constructed if voters approve the 2019 bond?

    Posted by:


    If voters approve bonds to construct a new campus or campuses, approximately 12-18 months prior to the opening of the campus, an attendance zone committee will be appointed by the Board of Trustees. The committee will be constructed in a way that is similar to how the BGC has been constructed, with a diverse community and AISD staff representation. This committee will work, over a period of months, to review, analyze, and synthesize data to include up-to-date student demographic projections, housing development projections, campus capacities, instructional programming needs, AISD transportation data, and community feedback.

    Like with the BGC, information about the attendance zone committee process and the committee’s work will be available to the community through the AISD website and frequent communications with staff, parents, and community members through social media, e-mails, community presentations, Board of Trustees meetings, press releases, and newsletters.

    The attendance zone committee will recommend proposed attendance zones to the Board of Trustees. The Board of Trustees will have the opportunity to provide feedback and ask questions to be considered by the committee. Ultimately, the Board of Trustees will be asked to approve attendance zones prior to the opening of new campuses.

    Please note that, if voters do not approve the bond, the district anticipates that elementary attendance zones will be redrawn in advance of the 2021-2022 school year in an effort to more equally distribute the student enrollment among the existing five elementary schools. The new attendance zones will be redrawn using the process described above.

    Comments (-1)
  • What impact is the future large Bear Creek development expected to have on AISD's growth?

    Posted by:


    In February 2019, the media announced that a Dallas-based developer had purchased a 2,000-acre tract of land on Bear Creek Road in the southern part of Aledo ISD and is planning a large residential subdivision for the location. Given the information that is available to the District, after meeting with a representative of the developer, and in consultation with the District’s demographers, the District expects that this planned development will most likely not begin to impact enrollment in the next 5 years, but may do so in the next 10 years. However, please note that circumstances may change, and the District will diligently monitor the situation to have the best understanding of the timing and extent of the planned development.


    Comments (-1)

Land & School Location

  • If voters approve the BGC's 2019 bond proposal, where will the new schools be located?

    Posted by:


    Middle School #2 would be located on land owned by Aledo ISD on Old Weatherford Road east of Holy Redeemer Catholic Church. Elementary #6 would be located on FM 5 across from the Annetta Cemetery.

    Comments (-1)
  • What size land does the District need for a school?

    Posted by:


    The amount of land needed for school sites vary given topography, access, availability of water and wastewater utilities, etc. In general, the following are the sizes of tracts that Aledo ISD pursues for future schools.

    Elementary: 15-20 acres
    Middle School: 35-40 acres
    High School: 75-100 acres

    Comments (-1)
  • What is the District doing to find land for new schools?

    Posted by:


    The District is actively looking for property for new schools, and has engaged a real estate broker to pursue tracts that are both on- and off-market. The District is also actively negotiating with residential real estate developers to obtain donated tracts for schools.

    Comments (-1)

Finance

  • What are the two components of the tax rate?


    Public school taxes involve two figures, which divide the school district budget into two “buckets.” 
    The first bucket is the Maintenance and Operations budget (M&O), which funds daily costs and recurring or consumable expenditures such as teacher and staff salaries, supplies, utilities, etc. Approximately 82 percent of the district’s M&O budget goes to teacher and staff salaries. Recapture is the primary means by which Chapter 41 school districts send local property tax revenue to the state for redistribution among other districts.

    The second bucket is the Interest and Sinking budget (I&S), also known as Debt Service, and that is used to repay debt for longer-term capital improvements approved by voters through bond elections. Proceeds from a bond issue can be used for the construction and renovation of facilities, the acquisition of land and the purchase of capital items such as equipment, technology and transportation. I&S funds cannot by law be used to pay M&O expenses, which means that voter-approved bonds cannot be used to increase teacher salaries or pay rising costs for utilities and services.

    tax rate



    What is happening to the school tax rate? 

    On August 27, 2019, the Aledo ISD Board of Trustees voted to decrease the district's maintenance and operations tax rate by approximately 10 cents, from $1.170 to $1.068 decreasing the overall school tax rate from $1.59 to $1.49. 

    If the District takes on more debt on the Interest & Sinking side of the budget, does that mean less money goes to teachers and classrooms?

    No, that is not the case. As the graphic below shows, there are two parts to the District’s tax rate/budget. The Maintenance & Operations (M&O) side pays for the day-to-day operational expenses of the District.

    The Interest & Sinking (I&S) side, also known as Debt Service, is used to repay debt for long-term capital improvements approved by voters through bond elections. Proceeds from a bond issue can be used for the construction and renovation of facilities, the acquisition of land and the purchase of capital items such as equipment, technology and transportation. By law, I&S funds cannot be used to pay M&O expenses, which means that voter-approved bonds cannot be used to increase teacher salaries, the number of teachers or other staff, or any other operational expense.

     

    What types of revenue does the District receive in the General Fund?

    The District’s General Fund is where the day-to-day operational expenses of the District are paid. In this fund, the District receives three types of revenues, local revenues, state revenues, and federal revenues. The primary source of General Fund local revenues is property taxes from the M&O portion of the property tax rate. Some of the additional local revenue sources are athletic revenues, fees from the rental of district facilities, and interest income earnings.

    State revenues in the General Fund come from the Texas Education Agency with the amount being determined according to the public school finance funding formulas set by the Texas Legislature. Federal revenues in the General Fund are reimbursements from School Health and Related Services (SHARS). The chart below reflects the General Fund revenue sources for the current and prior fiscal years.

    general fund chart



    What is the history of tax rate changes in Aledo ISD?


    The chart below shows the Aledo ISD tax rates from the 2005-2006 fiscal year to the current fiscal year. Following are brief explanations of the circumstances contributing to the changes in tax rates. After the 2005-2006 fiscal year, the Texas Legislature mandated the reduction or compression of the M&O tax rate over the 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 years for all school districts in Texas. The I&S tax rate increased in the 2008-2009 year to start repaying bonds authorized and sold from the passage of the 2008 bond election.

    In the 2010-2011 year, the I&S tax rate was reduced by 13 cents and the M&O tax rate was increased by 13 cents to reflect district voters passing a Tax Ratification Election (TRE) in August 2010. As you will note, the total tax rate remained the same.

    In the 2015-2016 year, the I&S tax rate increased by 16.98 cents as a result of voters approving the 2015 Bond Program (7.31 cents) and the elimination of the TRE “Tax Swap” subsidy (9.67 cents).





    Why does the District have to take on debt for construction?

    Much like an individual needs to borrow money to construct a home, school districts borrow money to build schools. Most families simply do not have the available monies to build or purchase a new residence without a mortgage. This same concept also applies to school districts. School districts simply do not have the financial resources available to pay for large capital expenditures, such as building new schools, renovating schools or building without taking on debt.

    What has the District done to pay off debt?

    When interest rates are low or decline, a family will often refinance their home mortgage to take advantage of these lower interest rates. Much like that family, the District has prudently managed the District’s outstanding voter-approved bonds. Whether by refinancing bonds at a lower interest rate, prepaying bonds before final maturity, or utilizing variable rate bonds, the District has provided its taxpayers with more than $34 million of direct savings since 2006.

    Much more detail on these debt management practices and savings may be found in the report the District’s Financial Advisor, BOK Financial Securities, recently presented to the District’s Board of Trustees and Bearcat Growth Committee.

    BOK report  
    BOK report

     

    Since property values are increasing, why doesn't the District just lower the Interest & Sinking tax rate?

    Rather than lower the District’s Interest & Sinking (I&S) tax rate, the District has determined that the most prudent course of action would be to prepay bonds before their scheduled maturity in an effort to save interest costs. For example, in February 2018, the District prepaid $1,275,000 of bonds before their scheduled maturity. This action resulted in $552,750 of savings for the District’s taxpayers. Additionally, in February 2019 the District prepaid $2,240,000 of bonds before their scheduled maturity. This prepayment resulted in $588,600 of savings for the District’s taxpayers. As mentioned above, since 2006, the District has saved over $34 million in interest costs due to managing its debt in this way.

Finance Cont’d

  • How does Aledo ISD’s amount of debt compare with other school districts?

    Posted by:


    This question may be answered by looking at the District’s outstanding voter-approved debt in a variety of ways. Many different comparisons may be found by reviewing the report the District’s Financial Advisor, BOK Financial Securities, recently presented to the District’s Board of Trustees and Bearcat Growth Committee. Click here to view the report.

    Comments (-1)
  • What has the District done to pay off debt?

    Posted by:


    When interest rates are low or decline, a family will often refinance their home mortgage to take advantage of these lower interest rates. Much like that family, the District has prudently managed the District’s outstanding voter-approved bonds. Whether by refinancing bonds at a lower interest rate, prepaying bonds before final maturity, or utilizing variable rate bonds, the District has provided its taxpayers with more than $34 million of direct savings since 2006.


    Much more detail on these debt management practices and savings may be found in the report the District’s Financial Advisor, BOK Financial Securities, recently presented to the District’s Board of Trustees and Bearcat Growth Committee. Click here to view the report.

    Comments (-1)
  • Is the District’s Interest & Sinking tax rate subject to recapture?

    Posted by:


    No, the District’s I&S tax rate is not subject to recapture. The District keeps 100% of the property taxes collected from the I&S or debt service portion of the District’s tax rate.

    Comments (-1)
  • What is the relationship between local revenues and state revenues?

    Posted by:


    Under current public school funding formulas, there is an inverse relationship between local revenues and state revenues. If local revenues increase, there is a corresponding decrease in state revenues. Alternatively, if local revenues were to decrease then state revenues would increase.

    Comments (-1)
  • If buses and furniture are purchased with bonds, does the District pay these over 30 years?

    Posted by:

     

    No, the District does not do this. The District fully repays bonds issued for projects based on their estimated useful lives. Repayment schedules are 10 years for school buses and furniture.

    Comments (-1)

Construction

  • What is the role of Aledo ISD's new Director of Construction & Facilities?

    Posted by:


    In the fall of 2018, the Aledo ISD Administration and Board of Trustees created the District’s first Director of Facilities & Construction position. The Administration and Board created the position so that Aledo ISD would have a construction professional on staff to serve the facility needs of the rapidly growing student population, and to represent, above all else, the interests of the Aledo ISD students, staff, and community. Tyler Boswell was hired by the Board of Trustees in November of 2018, and he leads and coordinates all facility planning and construction in the District, including the planning and implementation of bond programs. Mr. Boswell has more than 20 years of experience in leading all phases of construction projects and most recently worked in Arlington ISD as a project manager supervising 15 bond projects.

    Comments (-1)
  • How long does it take to build a new school?

    Posted by:


    A typical delivery schedule for a new elementary school to include planning, programming, design and construction is 24 months. A typical delivery schedule for a new middle school to include planning, programming, design and construction is 30 months. Delivery schedules may vary based on site and construction market conditions.

    Comments (-1)

BGC Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

  • How were members of the Bearcat Growth Committee chosen?

    Posted by:


    The following is the list of the 38 Bearcat Growth Committee members and how they were chosen.

    Arlene Shelton, Administration nomination (staff member)
    Bobby Taylor, Administration nomination (staff member)
    Brent Cummings, Website Application
    Carolyn Rekerdres, Website Application
    Chad Tregellas, Board Member Appointment - Forrest Collins 
    Christi James, Administration nomination
    Dan Reilley, Website Application
    David Nance, Website Application
    Dawn McNair, Administration nomination (staff member)
    Deven Jacobs, Administration nomination
    Jaime Saenz, Administration nomination
    Jeff Streetman, Website Application
    Jeff Wade, Board Member Appointment - David Lear
    Jennifer Gamez, Website Application
    Jeremy Pruett, Website Application
    Jeremy Thompson, Website Application
    Jim Scott, Administration nomination
    Kathy Fry, Website Application
    Kelly Arnold, Administration nomination (staff member)
    Allison Dearman, Administration nomination (staff member)
    Kelly Dishman, Website Application
    Nicki Dover, Administration nomination (staff member)
    Lakeshia Jarreau, Administration nomination
    Lauren Stockon, Administration nomination (staff member)
    Glenna Loftin, Administration nomination (staff member)
    Maggie Lozano, Administration nomination (staff member)
    Mandy Wurster, Website Application
    Matt Morris, Board Member Appointment - Jennifer Loftin
    Mercedes Mayer, Website Application
    Michael Fernighough, Website Application
    Nick Lester, Board Member Appointment - Jessica Brown
    Paul Heckathorn, Administration nomination
    Peter Healey, Administration nomination
    Robert Cox, Board Member Appointment - Hoyt Harris
    Ryan Pipkin, Website Application
    Shawna Ford, Board Member Appointment - Bobby Rigues
    Sterling Naron, Website Application
    Suzi Prokell, Board Member Appointment - Julie Turner

    Comments (-1)
  • Who is on the BGC?

    Posted by:


    The BGC includes teachers from each campus, parents and community members. The members are from a wide range of professional backgrounds and also include those without children in the district.

    Comments (-1)
  • Who led the BGC meetings?

    Posted by:


    The BGC meetings were led by Aledo ISD community members and Co-Chairs Christi James and Jim Scott. Having community co-chairs driving the BGC process as representatives of the community is an adjustment the District has made in the process.

    Comments (-1)
  • What is the charge of the BGC by the School Board?

    Posted by:


    The Bearcat Growth Committee is charged by the Board of Trustees to:
    -represent the priorities, expectations, and values of the entire community,
    -consider the needs of all of the district’s students,
    -use facts and data to make informed decisions,
    -recommend a program that meets the district’s building capacity needs for as long as possible and extends the life of facilities where possible,
    -understand the district’s finances to develop a program that is fiscally sound, and
    -recommend to the Board of trustees a bond program and the associated request of voters for a possible November 2019 bond election.

    Comments (-1)
  • Where can I find information from the meetings?

    Posted by:


    Informational documents from each meeting are shared on the Aledo ISD district website on the Bearcat Growth Committee pages. These webpages will provide all information related to meetings and information presented and will be continually updated. Click here to visit the BGC webpage.

    Comments (-1)
  • When did the BGC meet?

    Posted by:


    The BGC held its first meeting January 24, 2019, and met frequently through May 9, 2019. The BGC also met in August 2019 to construct a bond proposal for recommendation to the Aledo ISD Board of Trustees. Click here to view the BGC meeting schedule. The meetings, unless otherwise noted, were held at the Aledo ISD administration building, located at 1008 Bailey Ranch Road. Meetings were open to the public.

    Comments (-1)
  • What was discussed at BGC meetings?

    Posted by:


    During the BGC meetings, committee members examined Aledo ISD information provided by the District's demographers, financial advisors, as well as a school architecture firm hired to support the work of the BGC. They also toured facilities and evaluated, analyzed and synthesized data about enrollment, finances, instructional priorities and facility needs, as well as community, staff and student feedback. The committee members also created a bond proposal that they recommended to the Board of Trustees to consider.

    Comments (-1)
  • What is the Bearcat Growth Committee?

    Posted by:


    The Bearcat Growth Committee is a group of 38 Aledo ISD community members, parents and teachers from each campus that was appointed by the Aledo ISD Board of Trustees in December of 2018. The BGC was constructed from a combination of appointments by the Aledo ISD Board of Trustees, nominations from campus administrators and applications submitted by interested community members. The purpose of the BGC was to represent the Aledo ISD community in the study of data related to enrollment, finances, instructional priorities and facility needs, and in recommending to the Board of Trustees a bond program to address district-wide facility needs due to growing student enrollment and aging facilities.

    Comments (-1)